October is well underway by now, and with each passing day, Winter comes closer. As the weather starts to change it is high season for the sniffles. The common cold and the flu are high on the agenda and teachers are very much exposed to heightened risks by being around children all day, children who have been in contact with maybe 40 other classmates and their parents that day. I used to get colds and sore throats quite often when I first started teaching, and I tended to blame it on my students rather than myself. But there are some easy ways to try and avoid catching the sniffles during the changing weather season. Here are 8 tips to prevent the ESL sniffles this winter!

1. Wash Your Hands, Regularly

As a teacher, you are often in contact with students, but you are also often touching flashcards, books, pens, and pencils or even whiteboard markers that the students have come into contact with as well. I do this as much as I can, but especially during the winter months, I wash my hands before and after my classes, sometimes even in my breaks too. If the bathroom isn’t near, I keep a bottle of hand sanitizer with me at all times.

2. Avoid Touching Your Face

Cold and Flu viruses enter your body through the eyes, nose, and mouth. Those are also the parts of our face that we touch the most during the day. On average, we touch our faces 3-4 times per hour. Try to be mindful of this and avoid touching your face unless you have washed your hands.

3. Contain Your Coughs and Sneezes

When I worked in a supermarket a long time ago, the staff were all told that rather than covering a sneeze with our hands, if possible we should sneeze into our elbow if we do not have a tissue. Covering your mouth with your hand is a natural reflex, but the bacteria and virus will stick to your hands until you have a chance to clean them. Sneezing or coughing on the floor is better than into the air, but containing it all together is the best choice. A single-use tissue that you can throw away is the best, but your elbow is a good alternative.

4. Sanitize Whatever Your Students Touch

I often have students who need to borrow a pen or pencil, I have them write on the board with my markers or the children accidentally touch something else on my desk. Every now and then, I clean all the things that my students tend to touch. I have taken things a step further, and I have specific pens and pencils and markers that I let my students use, and then I have a set that only I use. But I clean them both when I have a chance.

5. Sip Tea

When I was a student myself, I used to think that coffee was only for old people and teachers. Here I am 20 years later pushing 30 and teaching myself, and I do love my coffee. But coffee isn’t always good for your immune system. Instead, herbal tea will do wonders for your sore throat and for keeping warm and fight off a cold or flu. I recently purchased a few bags of chamomile tea that I share with the Chinese teachers at my school. I also bought a big hand sanitizer that we could share so we don’t have to walk to the rest room all the time.

6. Relax

Relaxing may be a no-brainer, but it is actually quite essential for the basic functions of your body. Your immune system is always on alert during changing seasons, and it is important to give your body time to rest. Get plenty of sleep at night, and try to relax your mind for an hour or two before going to bed.

7. Vitamins

As a child, I used to hate it when my parents made me eat my vitamin pills, but today I tend to supplement with vitamins myself, especially during the colder months. I don’t really know if it has any effect, but together with everything else that I am doing, at least it couldn’t hurt, right? Most supermarkets or pharmacies will have vitamins either in pill form or as tablets dissolved in water (sometimes with pleasant flavors, too). I carry those around with me and do a vitamin shot when I can.

8. Hot Water

Any teacher who works in China will know that the number 1 recommendation (for just about anything) in China is drinking hot water. I personally dislike drinking hot water, I prefer it cold, but tea would also be a good substitute. Basically, it is about your body stay hydrated, and drinking water that is closer to your body temperature makes it easier for your body to utilize the water efficiently. It is also a great way to get warmer if you’re feeling cold.

Following these eight tips is how I try to stay clean of cold and flu in winter. I’d say I am mostly successful, but nothing is completely fool-proof. Is there anything that you find particularly useful for doing in winter to prevent the sniffles? Let me know in the comments below!

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