7 Things that must be included in every teaching contract

Handshake

So you’re hunting for the perfect teaching job. You’ve nailed first in your Skype interview, as well as your Skype demo lesson, and now you’ve been offered the job! Congratulations! Next, comes time for the tricky part: discussing the terms of your employment. Negotiating a contract for any job can be daunting, let alone a teaching job in a foreign land. Sometimes it’s difficult to know what inclusions should be standard, what terms you should negotiate, and what extras you deserve. I’ve negotiated more than a few employment agreements in my time, and have had several teaching contracts among them, so here’s my advice for 7 things that must be included in every teaching contract.

It sounds obvious, but it’s really important to be really clear on the exact length of your contract. For example a school may offer you a 12 month employment term, but the actual time you work there could vary depending on things like when your visa is finalized, school vacation times, and school terms. So be sure when reviewing a contract and before signing it, that you know what period you’re committing to working.

Once you’ve got the job, some schools will put you on probation for a number of months before you’re officially an employee. If you have to be on probation, be aware of the terms of probation. Make sure you know the length, the salary you’ll receive (you may receive less during your probation), and what you have to do to pass probation. It’s obviously best if all of this is clearly stated and agreed upon in writing, in your contract, or at least in a separate document you and your employer sign.

Perhaps another obvious sounding one but, agree on your salary before signing the contract, and make sure it’s outlined in the contract. Many schools will negotiate your salary, so don’t be afraid to ask for more. When negotiating, ask whether taxes, or other deductions will apply to your salary (like unemployment, pension, and so on), as this will of course affect your ‘take home’ salary. Once you’ve agreed on salary, confirm how you’ll be paid and when (most schools will pay into a bank account, once a month).

Linking into salary and salary negotiations, you’ll probably be offered additional benefits as part of your package. These can include health insurance, housing allowance, monthly or quarterly bonuses, a flight allowance or reimbursement, and/or transport allowances. Again, after you know exactly what offer is on the table (and you’ve negotiated where you see fit), make sure it’s included in your contract in detail, so it’s understood how much, and when.

Try to be as clear as possible on the working hours per week that you’re committing to, and will be paid for. Of course, some extra tasks may come up from time to time, but some schools may ask you to work extra unexpected hours, and you may not be paid for them! So check things like whether overtime will be paid (and at what rate), if you have to go to events or training outside of work hours, and whether your paid hours include class preparation time.

Check that your key duties and responsibilities (or even better, a job description) have been documented somewhere. It may not be outlined in your contract, but hopefully you can have a documented referenced in the contract, or included as an appendix to the contract. As with any job, there may be ‘scope creep’ during the time you’re employed. If you have a concreted document that was agreed upon upfront, it’s great to have something to refer to if you don’t feel like a task you’ve been asked to do is within the scope of your job.

One last extremely important thing, and you might simply assume this about contract negotiations, is only sign a contract if it’s written in English. Some foreign laws will state that if there are two signed contracts, each in different languages, and there is a dispute, the contract in the local language prevails. Unless you have a local person you trust implicitly who can read over the text and translate for you, don’t ever sign a contract in a language you don’t understand, no matter how much someone tries to convince you to do so!

Of course you can’t foresee absolutely everything that might go wrong in a teaching job abroad, but if you think seriously about these 7 things that must be included in every teaching contract, you can sleep soundly knowing you’ve done your best. Also remember, no one has a right to keep your passport for any length of time once your visa has been issued. Now good luck with your new job, and enjoy teaching English abroad!

What other things do you think should be included in a teaching contract? Let us know below!

Written by the Travelling Penster

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