How to improve your lesson planning with Board Order

Over the past several years, I have witnessed training schools moving from a more traditional style of teaching that mostly focused on either a blackboard or whiteboard, to using modern multimedia content and interactive whiteboards. However, when I started teaching, almost 8 years ago now, I learned to teach my classes only with a board and the occasional PowerPoint presentation.

Despite being a tech-savvy guy, it took me a while to get comfortable with using interactive whiteboards and I still, to this day, teach more than half of my lessons using the whiteboards. It is a habit, at this point, because this is how I got into teaching in the first place, but it is also because I feel like children and students spend enough time looking at computer screens already, and I can teach entertaining classes without having to turn on a computer. Also, I also like being prepared if the computer doesn’t work, the software doesn’t load, or another problem keeps you from using the interactive board.

A critical element that I paid a lot of attention to, during my own teacher training was board order. I think board order is included in pretty much every TEFL program today, but it is something that I think many teachers, new and experienced alike, tend to pay less attention to. But for me, board order is just as important to teach a class, as it is sketching out my PowerPoint presentation before I start making it. It gives me an idea of how my lesson is going to progress and transition between steps of your lesson.

By including board order in your lesson planning, you can reduce the time it takes you to get the information you want on the whiteboard, it reduces unnecessary erasing and re-writing, which will, in turn, help your class to flow better. As a teacher, you are engaging in a sort of public speaking, and one of the critical rules of speaking to an audience (your students) is that you have to face them. Talking into the whiteboard dramatically reduces the students’ ability to hear you, and the more time you have to spend facing the board, the less time you have to interact with your students. Also, what are your students doing while you’re writing on the board? Most likely, they’re doing nothing which is precious seconds taken away from your class time.

Many teachers put a lot of thought into how they progress through their lesson plans, their instructions, gestures, target language, and teaching aids. But less focus is being put on how you put all that information on the board.

If you know, that you will need to have your target sentence structure on the board, along with flashcards for an activity or a game, try to plan how you want it presented to the students so that they understand it. Make sure that, by the time you want to put up your flashcards, you do not need to spend 15-20 seconds erasing the board first. You cannot entirely avoid having to erase and re-write words or phrases, but you can limit it by planning your board use along with your class.

Just like with a PowerPoint presentation, seeing your slide can often help you remember what you are going to talk about next. Including a board order drawing along with your steps in your lesson plan, can sometimes help remind you of what you’re going to do next, and often, looking at your drawing will be faster than reading your teaching steps.

Here is a quick example using vocabulary as the part of my lesson I will illustrate. Now, this is not an in-depth lesson plan but it demonstrates how I make a simple plan for using my board in advance.

I am teaching 6 new animal words, in this lesson and what I like to do, with classes like these is that I start out with a brainstorm to get the students talking, and also get a sense of what animals they already know. So the first picture (top left) is my brainstorm, using most of the board, but arranging the animals my students tell me in a grid. Now, if they happen to say one of the word I am teaching today, I write that animal in one of the 6 boxes I marked on the left. All other animals go randomly into the other boxes. This means that my vocabulary is where I want it to be, for the next step. Once I am out of spaces or (even if some of the target vocabulary is missing), I will fill out the rest of the vocabulary words and move to the presentation.

Picture two (top right) I have erased the words and boxes I don’t need, and replaced them with a larger box or drawing area that I can use for illustrating each vocabulary word as I present it, and maybe have my students think of a few adjectives to describe each animal as we talk about it. I’d have the students do a crude drawing of the animal, write the word underneath with the adjectives we all mention in class and go through the animals one by one.

Picture three (bottom left) I will stick flashcards to the board inside of the large drawing area and remove the vocabulary words from the left hand side. Now, the left side will become a list of 6 example sentences, one for each animal, that we make as a class. For example “1. Tigers are very scary”, “2. Monkeys are very naughty”, and so on.

Finally, on picture 4, the right- hand side turns into a circular target area where the students can throw a ball and select a word, and now they can use the example sentences on the left to make their own sentences with the target vocabulary.

This method and procedure is very simplified, but illustrates my use of the board and minimizing my need for erasing and re-writing words. It gives me more time to teach and to interact with the students and less time where I am turning my back to them trying to get the board cleaned up for my next part.

Living Like a Local: How Do I Get WeChat?

I arrived in China before WeChat had taken over everything. In fact, I still remember carrying cash around and routinely taking out money from the ATMs. But I also lived in Luoyang at the time, which isn’t as developed and modern as Beijing and Shanghai. But I remember relying on the desktop version of QQ to contact people (QQ was all the rage back then) but there was no English version for phones just yet, and naturally the phone version of QQ did not include a translator. Things have sure changed!

Launched in 2011, QQ’s owner, Tencent, launched Wechat. A new instant messaging app that has since then taken China, and some parts of the world even, by storm. Similar to WhatsApp, Line, and other messaging apps, on the surface, but WeChat has developed a very sophisticated network of mini-apps, games, payment options, taxi-hailing, and bike-sharing. You can access just about anything form WeChat these days, and it can seem daunting at first, but believe me, just like Alipay, WeChat is a must have for anyone living in China.

Stay Connected

The most critical function of WeChat is to connect with people. You can stay in touch with friends and relatives, inside China and out. I had my family back in Denmark get WeChat on their phones because I do not always have access to Facebook. So now I can chat and call my parents and my sister with ease. You can send text messages, voice messages, videos, share your location, send a location, do voice- and video calls. WeChat has it all.

You can also let the world around you know what you are up to, using your Moments. Moments are similar to Facebook posts, and allow you to post short video clips, up to 9 pictures or text messages that others can “like” and comment on. This is how my family knows what I am doing every day.

You can add users based on their WeChat username, their phone number, QQ number (if they initially had one) and a personal QR code.

In WeChat you can also create chat groups. Groups can easily hold up to 500 members, and with some upgrades, they can have up to 1000 members. Groups are great for a couple of friends organizing an event or activity, or just putting your whole family together or even your department at work.

Shopping

WeChat pay, a feature similar to Alipay, has also become one of the cornerstones of WeChat. Restaurants, shops, even street vendors now allow you to pay with WeChat. You can have money in your WeChat wallet, or you can link your WeChat wallet to your bank-card as you do in Alipay and then do payments via scanning their QR code and sending the specified amount of money, or you can open WeChat pay, and they will scan your payment code. It is simple, efficient and very safe.

So how do I get WeChat?

Well, I am glad you asked!

WeChat can be found in most APP stores today, either as WeChat or 微信 (weixin) it’s Chinese name. Don’t worry, if you download the Chinese version of the app, you can change the language to English later. Open the app on your phone, and you can change the language on the front screen at the top right corner, log in at the bottom left, and sign up for your account at the bottom right.

On the following screen, you should enter your name, select the region of your phone number (in my case, I am already in China), enter your phone number and select a password. The password should be between 8-16 characters long and contain a symbol as well as a number. For example WeChat?0005

Click the green Sign Up button, and you’ll be taken through a little security check where you have to drag the missing piece of the picture onto the correct spot.

Next you’ll have to agree to the Privacy Policy guidelines, and finally, you will be asked to do an SMS verification. Using your phone number, send the shown text message to their number (you can click the “Send SMS” button, and it will do it for you). Once you’ve sent the message, return to the WeChat app and click the SMS Sent. Go to Next Step button, and after a short verification, your WeChat account will be open and ready for use!