ESL Suite

Blogging From Beyond the Great Firewall

Teach English in Tianjin: NOW HIRING at Public Schools & Universities

Great news for job seekers in China: There are still plenty of jobs at public schools and universities in Tianjin. Interested parties may apply to the link, or with the email address listed at the bottom of the post. You may apply yourself or refer a friend. I hope to hear from you soon!

Overview:

We’re seeking teachers for public school and universities across Tianjin Municipality. Public schools and university positions have the benefit of a regular work schedule, and the schools offer fully comprehensive curriculum with lesson plans and teaching materials provided, plus induction training upon arrival.

About Tianjin:

Tianjin is best known as the main port of entry for China’s northeastern manufacturing corridor. It’s the largest coastal city in the north and is just a stone’s throw from the capital – going to Beijing is a 30-minute ride by high-speed rail.

Tianjin has a rich history and has many examples of old British and Italian architecture. The famous Italian Concession Area has the largest cluster of Old Italian architecture outside of Italy. Other local attractions are the Huanyaguang section of the Great Wall, the Tianjin Eye and Tianjin’s Ancient Culture Street. Outside the city centre is Binhai, which includes Tanggu and TEDA (Tianjin Economic Development Zone). These areas are home to much of Tianjin’s commercial activity and is one of the engines driving the city’s rapid economic growth.

Job Title:

English Teacher in Tianjin, Tianjin Municipality | Public Primary/Secondary Schools and Universities

Contract Duration:

1 September 2015 – 30 June 2016

Responsibilities:

  • Teach classes of 25-45 students
  • Up to 25 classes weekly; full-time position (40 total hours)
  • Teaching oral English, preparing class activities
  • Monday – Friday schedule (weekends off)

Requirements:

  • Native English speaker from United States, Canada, UK, Australia, South Africa, Ireland, or New Zealand
  • 24-60 years old (to meet work visa age restrictions)
  • Bachelor’s degree or higher from an accredited university
  • Teaching experience is preferred
  • TEFL/TESOL certification
  • A clean criminal record
  • Excellent physical and mental health
  • Must be able to commit to a one-year contract

PLUS:

  • Sociable, positive and hard-working
  • Culturally inquisitive
  • Looking for a challenge

Remuneration:

  • Salary CNY 8,000 – 15,000/per month (commensurate with the teacher’s qualifications and experience)
  • Overtime paid at CNY 100/hour
  • Apartment allowance CNY 2,000/month OR a fully furnished single apartment (inquire during the interview for details)
  • Flight allowance CNY 5,000
  • Contract completion bonus CNY 3,000
  • Z-visa and residence permit
  • Health insurance
  • Paid Chinese holiday (11 days)
  • 7-days unpaid annual leave
  • Additional unpaid leave is negotiable with adequate prior notice
  • Unpaid holiday during summer and winter break (with the OPTION to work at private schools, international kindergartens, etc.)
  • Comprehensive cirriculum, lesson plans, and teaching materials provided
  • Teaching assistants for classes with young students *Induction training after arrival
  • Arrival support (airport pickup, arrange local bank account, phone, etc.)

How to apply:

If you are interested in applying for this position, we kindly request you prepare the following materials:

  • Your resume/CV
  • A recent photograph
  • Scan copy of your passport information page
  • Scan copies of your degree and TEFL/TESOL certificates
  • Your current location and preferred start date

Option 1: Apply through the link.

Option 2: Apply through email (jobs@eslsuite.com) and write “Tianjin Public School – WP” in the Subject Line of the email.

Due to the volume of applications received, please understand it may not be possible for the company to contact each candidate individually. A recruitment professional will be in contact with you if we are interested in pursuing your candidacy further.

Thank you again for your interest in this position, and for choosing ESL Suite to assist you with your job search in China!

Sincerely,

Christopher Ribeiro

Managing Director at ESL Suite in Tianjin

Why Study TESOL?

Thinking about teaching ESL overseas?
Thinking about teaching ESL overseas?

A TESOL certificate is your passport into the thrilling field of Teaching English overseas. There are over 300 million people studying English in China alone, so your job prospects after completing the course are fantastic.

But, this question should really be: why do you want our TESOL Certificate Course over all others? We provide a comprehensive course, which includes practicum here in Tianjin, an online specialization, and lifetime career support. We prepare our students for all aspects of life overseas.

What is TESOL? Teaching English overseas is a word full of acronyms. Here’s an overview: TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language), TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language), and TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) all teach English to non-native English speakers. The difference is: TESL is for teaching in an English speaking country while TEFL is for teaching English abroad. TESOL encapsulates them both. CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) is the British equivalent to the TESOL, but the 80-hours a TESOL student completes at their own pace is done in a classroom setting.

Why would I want a TESOL Certificate instead of a TESL, TEFL, or CELTA certificate? A teaching certificate is an investment, so it’s important to think about the upfront costs, and the return on investment. CELTA is very well-known, but a TESOL can be completed in less time, and at a fraction of the cost. The last part is important, because unless the job you’re applying for specifically calls for a CELTA, you’ll probably be able to get the same job with a TESOL.

Which study options does ESL Suite offer? We have two different methods of study. The first is our In-class course which is offered in Tianjin, China. This is the preferred method of completion. Classes are fun, lively, and full of like-minded people. Students learn from each other, as well as the instructor. If you cannot find the time or cannot attend the course in China, you can take the course online. There is no difference in the materials covered, regardless of the method of study. So, it’s simply a matter of deciding which learning style is best for you, while taking into account your budget and schedule.

What kind of job can I get after I complete the course? When teaching abroad, you may teach students of all ages. Children as young as three go to English kindergartens, while senior citizens study English as a hobby. You might teach primary or secondary students, businessmen, housewives, other teachers, or people who study English to improve their job prospects. Most schools focus on one or two age groups, so if you have a very strong preference for a specific age, make sure you’re placed accordingly. English teachers are in high demand in China, South Korea, Taiwan, Turkey, and the Middle East, so it’s also a good idea to start thinking about which location fits your broader personal/professional goals.

How can I get started? We have weekly information seminars in Tianjin, but for those who don’t live nearby, we’re happy to answer questions by phone,email, or schedule a consultation via Skype. The course dates are listed below, and you may register for one of our sessions here.

2015 Courses

  • October 14-18
  • November 4-8
  • December 2-6
2016 Courses

  • January 20-24
  • February 24-28
  • March – Dec: TBD

“Friends of the Firm” Referrals: Don’t forget to tell a friend! We believe there’s no better source for teachers than from a trusted friend! That’s where you come in. We offer generous bonuses for referrals to our TESOL courses, or for successful teacher referrals. Here’s how it works:

  • Online TESOL referral: $50
  • In-Class TESOL referral: $100
  • Teacher referral: $100

***Bonuses are paid for TESOL referrals after the student has paid in-full; for teacher referrals 3-months after the teacher arrives in China. 

There’s no better motivation to launch your overseas teaching career than to enroll in a TESOL course. I did it seven years ago, and it completely changed my life. I came to Tianjin in 2009 and haven’t looked back. In the meantime, I’ve traveled to Japan, Korea, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, India, Indonesia, and at least a dozen other countries! And, I’m not alone – for many people, teaching English and traveling the world becomes a preferred lifestyle choice.

The Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu said, “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago; the second best time is now.” Your dreams also may be waiting for you just around the corner – get started today!

http://www.eslsuite.com

Celebrate Spring Festival with a ‘Bang!’

Spring Festival Chongqing 02China’s biggest holiday of the year is 春节 (“chun jie” – Spring Festival), or Chinese New Year as it’s referred to in the West. Spring Festival is like Christmas and New Year’s Eve combined into a one week super-holiday. Nearly everyone returns home to see their family during Spring Festival, so it’s the annual cause of the largest human migration on Earth; every year China sets a new record for the most people traveling at the same time. Last year, around 260 million people traveled to various parts of the country within just a matter of days.

Because Chinese holidays are set according to the lunar calendar, the Chinese New Year doesn’t usually start until late January or early February – this year, Spring Festival started on February 18th. Unlike Christmas and New Year in the Western world, which are traditionally only celebrated for one day each, Spring Festival is celebrated from the last day of the last month, for fifteen days until the Lantern Festival on the fifteenth day of the first month. Throughout these fifteen days, people have dinners at home with loved ones, play traditional Chinese games like Mahjong, and exchange gifts such as 红包 (“hong bao” – red envelopes full of money). It is also tradition to wear new clothes at the start of the New Year, so the few days before the Spring Festival begins it’s common for everyone to go shopping for new (usually red) clothes.

The staple food during Chinese Spring Festival is dumplings. The 馅儿 (“xian’er” – stuffing, or flavor) varies by region. In the north for example, Spring Festival dumplings are often filled with pork, shrimp, and leeks. Another salient feature of Spring Festival is the hanging of red lanterns along the road, and 春联 (“Chun lian” – Spring Festival couplets) on doorways and windows. These are usually adorned with Chinese characters for happiness, health and fortune. It is believed that hanging these symbols in your house will bring good luck in the New Year.

Perhaps the most important (and loudest) part of Spring Festival is playing with firecrackers. Unlike in the west where we shoot fireworks into the sky for the New Year, Chinese firecrackers are smaller in size, but larger in number. Instead of shooting off a single rocket, the Chinese will light firecrackers that are several meters long with several thousand smaller bangs. The shooting of fireworks and firecrackers can be heard year round in China (especially during weddings or when a new business opens), but Spring Festival is when they are most prevalent. At midnight of the New Year, you will hear hundreds of thousands of firecrackers being set off simultaneously, and the festivities last deep into the night. The purpose is to scare away evil spirits with the loud noise, and as a blessing to mark a new beginning.

Although celebrations are similar across China, some Spring Festival traditions are slightly different from place to place. Big, modern cities like Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai and Chongqing – though in different parts of the country – celebrate Spring Festival in a very similar fashion. But each province has their own way of doing things. This is especially true as you venture further into the countryside to the small villages; there are ways of celebrating that are unique to their specific location.

Being in China during Spring Festival is indeed a remarkable and memorable experience. Aspects of it remind me of Christmas in my home country of Denmark; it’s not necessarily just about gifts and food, but a chance to spend time with family and enjoy the spirit of the season.  Enjoying this type of festive season while living abroad is very special, and is a great reminder of why I have chosen China as a place to live and work.

By: Mikkel Larsen

Mikkel Larson
Mikkel Larson

Mikkel is a Chongqing based teacher, blogger, and photographer. He has lived in China since 2010, and can be found blogging here, here, and here

City Profile: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province

Gone are the days when every aspiring teacher wanted to go to either Beijing or Shanghai – Shenzhen is the hottest destination for today’s TEFL crowd. Just thirty-five years ago Shenzhen was nothing more than a small village adjacent to Hong Kong Island. But, Deng Xiaoping’s great “Reform and Opening” brought swift change. Shenzhen became China’s first Special Economic Zone, and the economy subsequently took off. Today, Shenzhen is a boomtown – the first ‘Mega-City’ to spring up in the Pearl River Delta. It boasts a thriving economy specializing in international trade, foreign investment, manufacturing, and financial services offered by the Shenzhen Stock Exchange.

Because of the city’s humble beginnings as a fishing village, it doesn’t have as many cultural or historical attractions as Beijing, Nanjing, or Xi’an. But there’s an offset to this drawback; because of the many opportunities here, it attracts job-seekers from every corner of China. As a result, Shenzhen is one of the most diverse cities in the mainland. Regional cultures, customs, and cuisines from various parts of China blend seamlessly. Not to mention, Shenzhen has loads of modern sights and places of interest, such as the Window of the World, Xichong Beach, Happy Valley Theme Park.

Being a cosmopolitan city with a large expat community, there’s no shortage of western restaurants, bars and nightclubs; plus, plenty of parks, temples, theaters and museums. Shenzhen is a symbol of China’s modern economy, and the birthplace of the entrepreneurial spirit that is now found even in the most remote parts of the country.

If it’s for three days or a year, experiencing Shenzhen should be high on everyone’s ‘to-do’ list when passing through China.

Have a look at our China job board for more information about working in Shenzhen (or anywhere else in China)!

How to Nail a Skype Interview – Follow These 9 Tips

Webcam
Don’t forget to smile!

“Can you hear me? I can see you but I can’t hear you….wait….OK….no….now I can’t see you, either.”

Sound familiar? The fact is, Skype interviews probably require as much preparation as interviewing face-to-face. An online interview gives the interviewee a few advantages, but several unique disadvantages.

For instance, one good point is that you can keep some notes in front of you out of sight of the camera. That’s great, right?

Well, the bad news is you’re talking to your computer – or a tiny, robotic-eye sitting next to your computer. And some people (such as me) don’t come off very well on camera.

Good and bad aside, there are a few keys which will guarantee you make a positive impression. Most of these won’t be revelations, simply because they’re the types of things you ought to do in a face-to-face interview anyway.

Here they are:

  1. Be on time for the interview. It’s a good idea to be sure you’ve added the interviewer a day before the call. If the interviewer is late on the day of the interview, be patient. Send an instant message if it goes past 15 minutes. It’s possible an earlier interview ran longer than expected. If you can’t connect, send an email to ask if you can reschedule for another day. Something unexpected probably came up, and they’ll likely be happy to chat with you another day.
  2. Make sure the surroundings behind you are tidy, and find a QUIET place. If you have roommates or live together with family, remind them of your interview time so you aren’t interrupted.
  3. Test your equipment the day before and the day of the interview. There’s nothing more frustrating than having technical problems during an online interview. If problems arise and persist, explain politely what is happening and ask to redial.
  4. Dress for the job. If the job is for an ESL teacher, business casual would be best. Men should get rid of the 5 o’clock shadow – shave before the interview. Oh, and if you’re thinking of pulling a “Ron Burgundy” and not wearing any trousers – think again. You never know when you might have to suddenly get up to check your internet connection or webcam.
  5. Smile. This is a no-brainer if you’re interviewing in person, but being personable and smiling are more difficult when you’re in a room alone. Test your appearance on camera before the interview to check for posture, gestures, facial expressions, etc. Try a practice run with a friend or family member and ask for honest feedback.
  6. Use the interviewers name often – it can help develop a connection between the two of you even though you’re not in the same room.
  7. Before the interview begins, tell the interviewer in advance that you will be taking notes. You can politely begin, “I apologize in advance if there are a few pauses here and there, I’ll be jotting down some notes during the interview.” This will ease the awkward feeling when no one is speaking. Plus taking notes will give you a few ideas to come back to when you have questions at the end.
  8. Cheat like crazy. Keep notes about the company handy for easy reference. Being able to glance quickly at information about the position, company or questions for the end of the interview can work in your favor. That said, keep the notes short – if you’re shuffling through dozens of pages off camera it’ll definitely tip-off your interviewer that something’s amiss.
  9. Be yourself. You have a lot to offer to the company – it’ll be more likely to come through during the interview if you’re relaxed!

This list is probably not exhaustive – if you have any other tips I’d love to hear them!

Oh, and if you’re wondering what not to do – just watch this clip:

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