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7 Things that must be included in every teaching contract

Handshake

So you’re hunting for the perfect teaching job. You’ve nailed first in your Skype interview, as well as your Skype demo lesson, and now you’ve been offered the job! Congratulations! Next, comes time for the tricky part: discussing the terms of your employment. Negotiating a contract for any job can be daunting, let alone a teaching job in a foreign land. Sometimes it’s difficult to know what inclusions should be standard, what terms you should negotiate, and what extras you deserve. I’ve negotiated more than a few employment agreements in my time, and have had several teaching contracts among them, so here’s my advice for 7 things that must be included in every teaching contract.

It sounds obvious, but it’s really important to be really clear on the exact length of your contract. For example a school may offer you a 12 month employment term, but the actual time you work there could vary depending on things like when your visa is finalized, school vacation times, and school terms. So be sure when reviewing a contract and before signing it, that you know what period you’re committing to working.

Once you’ve got the job, some schools will put you on probation for a number of months before you’re officially an employee. If you have to be on probation, be aware of the terms of probation. Make sure you know the length, the salary you’ll receive (you may receive less during your probation), and what you have to do to pass probation. It’s obviously best if all of this is clearly stated and agreed upon in writing, in your contract, or at least in a separate document you and your employer sign.

Perhaps another obvious sounding one but, agree on your salary before signing the contract, and make sure it’s outlined in the contract. Many schools will negotiate your salary, so don’t be afraid to ask for more. When negotiating, ask whether taxes, or other deductions will apply to your salary (like unemployment, pension, and so on), as this will of course affect your ‘take home’ salary. Once you’ve agreed on salary, confirm how you’ll be paid and when (most schools will pay into a bank account, once a month).

Linking into salary and salary negotiations, you’ll probably be offered additional benefits as part of your package. These can include health insurance, housing allowance, monthly or quarterly bonuses, a flight allowance or reimbursement, and/or transport allowances. Again, after you know exactly what offer is on the table (and you’ve negotiated where you see fit), make sure it’s included in your contract in detail, so it’s understood how much, and when.

Try to be as clear as possible on the working hours per week that you’re committing to, and will be paid for. Of course, some extra tasks may come up from time to time, but some schools may ask you to work extra unexpected hours, and you may not be paid for them! So check things like whether overtime will be paid (and at what rate), if you have to go to events or training outside of work hours, and whether your paid hours include class preparation time.

Check that your key duties and responsibilities (or even better, a job description) have been documented somewhere. It may not be outlined in your contract, but hopefully you can have a documented referenced in the contract, or included as an appendix to the contract. As with any job, there may be ‘scope creep’ during the time you’re employed. If you have a concreted document that was agreed upon upfront, it’s great to have something to refer to if you don’t feel like a task you’ve been asked to do is within the scope of your job.

One last extremely important thing, and you might simply assume this about contract negotiations, is only sign a contract if it’s written in English. Some foreign laws will state that if there are two signed contracts, each in different languages, and there is a dispute, the contract in the local language prevails. Unless you have a local person you trust implicitly who can read over the text and translate for you, don’t ever sign a contract in a language you don’t understand, no matter how much someone tries to convince you to do so!

Of course you can’t foresee absolutely everything that might go wrong in a teaching job abroad, but if you think seriously about these 7 things that must be included in every teaching contract, you can sleep soundly knowing you’ve done your best. Also remember, no one has a right to keep your passport for any length of time once your visa has been issued. Now good luck with your new job, and enjoy teaching English abroad!

What other things do you think should be included in a teaching contract? Let us know below!

Written by the Travelling Penster

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Teaching in Public Schools – What You Need to Know

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I know it sounds cliché, but travelling halfway across the world to teach English in China was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. Sometimes it was challenging, other times rewarding, but above all, it was an experience that created memories that will last a lifetime.

If you come to China to teach English through a recruiting company, chances are high that you will be placed in a public school. This is good news, as teaching in a public school compared to other learning institutions has far more perks than drawbacks, and I’m here today to explain what you need to know before you embark on your public school teaching adventure. Let’s get started!

Big class sizes

I know this sounds frightening, but trust me, it’s easy to get used to and might actually be easier to teach than small classes! Public school classes in China are big: they average around 45-60 students per class. Don’t let this intimidate you however, as bigger class sizes have their perks. If you’re not a morning person (like me) and you need a jolt of energy to really get you going, a big, energetic class will help you do that. It is much easier to be an active teacher when you can feed off the energy of grade school students hungry for knowledge.

When doing class activities in a big class, you can extend the duration of some activities to make sure most students in your class get a try. An activity that would maybe take less than 5 minutes in a class of 20 can likely go up to 10 minutes in a class of 50! In addition, a big class will likely contain a few students who speak English at a decent level, so when you throw out a question and are met with blank stares from 98% of your students, you can always count on those few whiz kids to help you keep things moving.

Short class times

You’ll be happy to know that an average public school lesson only lasts about 40-45 minutes. This is much, much shorter than my average high school lessons, which went up to 75 minutes! The great thing about having 40-minute lessons is that you can keep your lessons tight, focused, punchy, and energetic, while still giving everyone in class a fair shot at participating. With shorter lessons, you won’t need to do too much prep work as all you will need are four to five well-thought out activities that will keep your students active. And if a lesson isn’t going as well as you hoped it would… relax! You’ll be out of there in less than 40 minutes so you can go work out the kinks!

A (relatively) easy schedule

Compared to some training centres and private schools, public schools won’t require you to spend too much time teaching classes every week. Though it varies from school to school, you can expect to teach up to 17 classes per week, for a grand total (17 x 40 minutes) of just over 11 hours per week in the classroom. Often, this total is less, and you can usually expect to teach around 12 to 15 classes per week.

In addition, some schools won’t require you to stay in the office when you don’t have class, so you can head home and run errands after you finish your last class for the day. However, I do suggest spending time in the office to get to know your fellow teachers. After all, you will be working with them for the whole year and they can be great sources of teaching and discipline advice. And if your relationship with them is great, they may even do you a favour sometime (class swap, anyone?)

Freedom!

If you don’t like following a strict curriculum where you teach lots of grammar points you aren’t comfortable with, you will be well-suited to teach in public schools. Though some schools do require you to teach certain grammar points from their textbook, many of them give you free reign to teach whatever you like! This might be a disadvantage for those of us who would like some order or some idea on which to base our lessons. But for those of us who don’t like being bound by rigid rules, we can design our lessons however we like! The method I recommend is just to pick a topic your classes might find interesting and base your lesson off that. Then, you could throw in a grammar point, speaking practice, funny video, game… the possibilities are virtually endless!

You don’t need to speak Chinese at all… but it helps

Every public school will assign you a “contact teacher”, who will likely be a local English teacher at your school. He or she will be your translator/messenger for the whole year and will be responsible for letting you know about everything that may involve you, such as school events, holidays, or schedule changes.

Having a contact teacher around essentially means you don’t have to learn a word of Chinese to get by at your school. However, your contact teacher may not be the best communicator. You know that afternoon you thought you had free? Well your schedule changed and now you have a class at 3pm that your contact teacher told you about at 2:45pm. Also, your contact teacher won’t always be around to help you tell the printing lady you want 200 crosswords printed out ASAP. A good thing to do is to start learning Chinese and practice by talking to your colleagues. Bit by bit, you’ll be able to do things independently and you’ll have a much smoother teaching experience.

You’ll have to become a “Yes” man/woman

Likely the best piece of advice I can give you to make the most out of your public school teaching experience is: be involved! Yes, I know I said that some schools technically don’t require you to be there don’t have any classes to teach, but you should make an effort to get involved in the goings-on of your school.

Here’s the best way to do that: your school, like any other school, will have a bunch of events scattered throughout the year that you will be asked to participate in. That may be a sports day, a Christmas show, judging a language competition, or playing on the staff basketball team, to name a few. The best thing you can do is ask your contact teacher or your coworkers about upcoming events, and if they invite you to participate, enthusiastically say yes! Unless you have made other plans without any knowledge of said event, you really have no excuse not to join. Now, if you’re feeling event-fatigue and just really don’t want to do them all, just go to the most important ones (Sports Day, Christmas, and English competitions). I’m pretty sure your school will still like you if you’re “sick” on the day of the singing competition.

For prospective public school teachers, I hope you will have as good of a time as I did. What’s the point of coming to China if not to create lasting memories and an experience you will never forget? Remember to check out my blog, Country and a Half , for China advice and more. Happy teaching!

Guest post by Ivan Berezowski

Ivan is a writer/translator who spent three years teaching English in the bustling metropolis of Shenzhen, China. When he isn’t writing blog posts to help newcomers in China, he can be found behind a plate of exotic cuisine or hard at work saving money for his next holiday. Check out his blog Country and a Half (www.countryandahalf.com), or follow him on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram for more exciting information out of China.

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How I Stayed Sane While Experiencing Culture Shock in China. Part 3: When everything is Cool

This article is part of a series on experiencing, and dealing with, culture shock in China. The articles are based on my own experiences moving to and living in China, looking back at how I overcame each phase of culture shock, making it through to the other side and having stayed in China for over seven years.

Previous (What is Culture Shock?)

The first time I visited China was my trip to Shanghai in 2010 right before the Chinese Spring Festival, the Chinese festival similar to our Christmas and New Year’s Eve put together into one. Everywhere I went I saw red lanterns, happy people, and tall skyscrapers. I fell in love instantly.

Shanghai Skyline

A friend of mine, a local Chinese girl, was working in Shanghai at the time, and she agreed to show me around. Coming to China for the first time as a tourist can be a bit overwhelming. Many do not speak English very well so having someone around who could help was valuable.

Having someone around to talk to the taxi drivers, show you around and take care of you was great. I got to experience everything while worrying about nothing. My visit to Shanghai was smooth, energetic and full of excitement. A great experience, everything was cool!

I finally moved to China in the summer of 2010, starting out with a month-long TEFL training program in Beijing and then moving to Changsha in Hunan province for my 5-month teaching practice. The time in Beijing was like a study-holiday. We would study during the week, but we would go on trips on the weekends.

The Great Wall of China

Arriving in Changsha, we lived at a privately owned boarding school for primary grade students. We worked in the English teachers’ office, and all the teachers communicated well. They took care of most things for us, and we were even assigned a kind of “buddy” who would help us out with anything we needed.

It was great! It was not my first time in China, but it was my first time in Changsha, entirely different from Shanghai and Beijing. Every day was a new experience, and something as simple as going to the supermarket was a new feeling. Shopping alone was a challenge and an experience. Missing your bus stop was an excuse to wander and get lost, talking to a person saying more than just “hello” felt satisfying. “I could live here!”

New people, new tastes, and smells, the language, the culture. I felt like I was living an adventure, nothing could compare. I was not making much money or anything special, but the experience was fantastic, and I loved every second.

Chicken feet, you gotta have’em!

Moving to China was, however, not my first time to live in a foreign country for an extended period of time. I spent one high-school semester studying at the TAFE institute in Wagga Wagga (Yes, that’s the name of the city) in Australia. Wagga Wagga is the biggest inland city, about 400 kilometers east of Sydney. I knew that eventually, I would face a wave of discomfort and slight depression because I’d gone through it once already when I was there. Having traveled a lot with my parents and sister as a child, I am very familiar with this feeling, and I can sense when it is starting to change. For me, personally, this is a great tool because I can then prepare for the coming phase of uncertainty where the excitement is replaced with worry, confusion and, sometimes, anger. Having had this particular experience before, also made me able just to enjoy how I was feeling, and mentally prepare myself. I wouldn’t be surprised by the onset of the depression stage, I was anticipating it.

In Australia, everyone speaks English, so even when I was feeling down, it was easy to talk to people around me. In China, I was surrounded by English Speaking teachers who all communicated quite well, but where Australia shares a lot of culture with other Western countries, China is vastly different, and sometimes the culture and how people behave can be tricky to adjust to.

While you are enjoying yourself, wandering around, getting lost and tasting the delicious food, remember to get to know the people around you. It is easy to get lost in your own agenda when all you want to do is explore your new surroundings. But your friends and colleagues will be an essential lifeline for when you start feeling down. Take them with you, explore together, share memories and your adventures. Don’t forget to talk to your friends and family back home, the more they know about what you are doing and experiencing, the more they will be of help when you need them later.

How to manage your students, without saying a word

One of the biggest factors of having a good class is how you, as the teacher, can effectively manage the classroom. Also called classroom management. Classroom management is where new teachers struggle to adapt because a lot of teacher training today is focused on how to teach vocabulary, grammar, and writing but doesn’t dive deep enough into the art of actually having the students under control. It is not only about how your students behave, or whether or not they sit quietly and listen, but also about how you move from topic to topic, how you explain the steps of your activity and how you deal with students who lose focus or are having difficulties.

Classroom management, for me, is perhaps the single biggest factor that determines whether or not a class went well. I can have a great time teaching students who are struggling with the content but somehow seem to understand what I want to do and how to do the activities. Similarly, I can have a terrible time teaching students who are at a high level, but I am unable to manage efficiently, and they start doing their own thing. Also, if the students do not understand my instructions, fail to understand the activity I am explaining and have no idea why I just raised my voice, the class can feel rather exhausting.

After struggling with classroom management myself for months, I finally found my best weapon was not my words or my voice, but my body. I always had a talent for imitating characters like Mr Bean, and I always loved to act. I realised that my movements and gestures were often more efficient in conveying meaning than my words, just because my students did not know my words, but my actions were. I started to teach students to look at my actions as well as my words, made it an integral part of my classroom routines and suddenly explaining new vocabulary, a new game or activity became a lot easier, and my classes started flowing much better.

Gestures accompany your language, but cannot entirely replace it.

Some gestures are powerful enough that they can replace upwards of a dozen words of explanation. The same way a picture says 1000 words, gestures can save time explaining, and keeping your gestures and language linked closely together will increase your students understanding, and you can use that gesture later.

Gestures can communicate pretty much anything, whether you need to facilitate discussions, encourage more interaction, do error correction, teach vocabulary or convey an emotion. You are likely already using some simple gestures in your classroom already, “stop,” “stand up,” “be quiet,” “sit down” and “listen” as well as students raising their hand when they have a question are all commonplace in classrooms across the world. A thumbs up or an applause for praise and encouragement, an open palm to invite a student to talk or making an X with your arms to signal a wrong answer are also fairly common, but you can take non-verbal classroom language much further.

Try and consider some of the classroom languages you often have to use that maybe your students do not always understand. For me, it is often instructions like “make a sentence,” “what does this mean?” “ask a question,” “work in pairs,” or even something as simple as “take a break.” Try for yourself to make gestures for each of these words or phrases:

• Work in Pairs
• Ask the other students
• What do you think?
• Nearly right
• Stand up / Sit down
• It is your turn
• Make a longer/complete sentence
• Please, stop talking now
• Three minutes left
• Listen to me
• Don’t show your paper to your partner
• Good job
• Open your book (to page #)
• Read
• Write
• Listen
• Spell
• Quiet Down / It is time for class

Can you think of any other useful classroom language words or phrases for which you could use gestures?

By using my body more than my voice has allowed me to make my classes more enjoyable for my students and myself. I spend less time raising my voice, even when my students are misbehaving because they can look at my gestures and body language to know what I am thinking. On top of that, I tend to make my gestures exaggerated and comical because laughing is always a good way to keep students interested in you.

The Nasty Truth About Teaching ESL in China

Anyone who spends ten minutes reading online reviews of schools in China knows this: teaching English in China is a horrible, miserable experience you wouldn’t wish on anyone.

But why is it when people come here and actually speak to expats who have been teaching for a while, they hear a different story? Their friends say: it’s fun, they love their school, and they plan on staying two or three more years.

The reason is simple: selection bias. Wikipedia says selection bias occurs when, “…groups or data for analysis in such a way that proper randomization is not achieved, thereby ensuring that the sample obtained is not representative of the population intended to be analyzed.”

So what is it about the people who write these horrid reviews of ESL schools that skews the sample? Generally speaking, those who gather on ESL threads to bash their school are negative people who’ve developed a herd mentality. They say “misery loves company,” and what better way to increase your feeling of self-worth than to join into a frenzied mob of disgruntled teachers with an ax to grind?

Their posts often start like this: “I worked at Blah Blah Blah English School for three years and boy they were a bunch of….”.

Riiiiight. So, this place was so incredibly terrible you stayed for how many years?

Many people forget an important fact: You’ll have problems at your job in China….just like you did at your job at home! There’s no such thing as a “perfect job,” and being able to cope with difficulties in your workplace is a part of life. Learning how to deal with these problems means you’re not lying when you write, “Works effectively in cross-cultural settings.” on your CV.

There’s also a subset of people in China who “can’t hack it” in their home country, and are forced to stay in a foreign country for much longer than they’d like. They’ll tell you how much they hate the food, the people, their school, etc. If you talk to this person long enough, you’ll probably also discover they think their home country is rubbish, too. These people have no business teaching, especially teaching children!

 
Okay, okay – I’ll get off my soapbox now! Do you want to know the truth about teaching ESL in China?

  1. You’ll be surrounded by the laughter of happy children every day
  2. You’ll work with a diverse group of really interesting people
  3. You’re doing something bold and growing as a person
  4. You’ll see sights, eat foods, hear sounds, and smell smells you never imagined
  5. You’ll earn good money while doing work that’s challenging and rewarding

I know it can be pretty shocking to hear, but that’s the nasty truth! The people who teach overseas (and stay because they love it) generally don’t spend their hours trolling ESL message boards. Ya’ know, because they’re outside…enjoying their life. Maybe eating dumplings, or climbing a mountain, or writing in their journal.

 

Have you spent a year or more teaching overseas? We’d love to hear your thoughts and stories! If you have incredible travel photos, please send them our way!

Also, if you’d like to learn more about how to become a guest blogger, write us at info@eslsuite.com with the phrase “Guest Blogger” in the SUBJECT LINE.

Written by Christopher Ribeiro | Managing Director at ESL Suite

roundedChristopher came to Tianjin via Buffalo, New York, and Los Angeles. He’s lived in China since 2009, and has traveled to over 20 countries on six continents. Christopher has been in teaching and recruiting for over five years – he’s the co-founder of ESL Suite, a husband, and father to two strapping little boys. If he’s not at work, you’ll find him in the gym, or narrowly dodging oncoming traffic on his fixed-gear bicycle.

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Teach English in Tianjin: NOW HIRING at Public Schools & Universities

Great news for job seekers in China: There are still plenty of jobs at public schools and universities in Tianjin. Interested parties may apply to the link, or with the email address listed at the bottom of the post. You may apply yourself or refer a friend. I hope to hear from you soon!

Overview:

We’re seeking teachers for public school and universities across Tianjin Municipality. Public schools and university positions have the benefit of a regular work schedule, and the schools offer fully comprehensive curriculum with lesson plans and teaching materials provided, plus induction training upon arrival.

About Tianjin:

Tianjin is best known as the main port of entry for China’s northeastern manufacturing corridor. It’s the largest coastal city in the north and is just a stone’s throw from the capital – going to Beijing is a 30-minute ride by high-speed rail.

Tianjin has a rich history and has many examples of old British and Italian architecture. The famous Italian Concession Area has the largest cluster of Old Italian architecture outside of Italy. Other local attractions are the Huanyaguang section of the Great Wall, the Tianjin Eye and Tianjin’s Ancient Culture Street. Outside the city centre is Binhai, which includes Tanggu and TEDA (Tianjin Economic Development Zone). These areas are home to much of Tianjin’s commercial activity and is one of the engines driving the city’s rapid economic growth.

Job Title:

English Teacher in Tianjin, Tianjin Municipality | Public Primary/Secondary Schools and Universities

Contract Duration:

1 September 2015 – 30 June 2016

Responsibilities:

  • Teach classes of 25-45 students
  • Up to 25 classes weekly; full-time position (40 total hours)
  • Teaching oral English, preparing class activities
  • Monday – Friday schedule (weekends off)

Requirements:

  • Native English speaker from United States, Canada, UK, Australia, South Africa, Ireland, or New Zealand
  • 24-60 years old (to meet work visa age restrictions)
  • Bachelor’s degree or higher from an accredited university
  • Teaching experience is preferred
  • TEFL/TESOL certification
  • A clean criminal record
  • Excellent physical and mental health
  • Must be able to commit to a one-year contract

PLUS:

  • Sociable, positive and hard-working
  • Culturally inquisitive
  • Looking for a challenge

Remuneration:

  • Salary CNY 8,000 – 15,000/per month (commensurate with the teacher’s qualifications and experience)
  • Overtime paid at CNY 100/hour
  • Apartment allowance CNY 2,000/month OR a fully furnished single apartment (inquire during the interview for details)
  • Flight allowance CNY 5,000
  • Contract completion bonus CNY 3,000
  • Z-visa and residence permit
  • Health insurance
  • Paid Chinese holiday (11 days)
  • 7-days unpaid annual leave
  • Additional unpaid leave is negotiable with adequate prior notice
  • Unpaid holiday during summer and winter break (with the OPTION to work at private schools, international kindergartens, etc.)
  • Comprehensive cirriculum, lesson plans, and teaching materials provided
  • Teaching assistants for classes with young students *Induction training after arrival
  • Arrival support (airport pickup, arrange local bank account, phone, etc.)

How to apply:

If you are interested in applying for this position, we kindly request you prepare the following materials:

  • Your resume/CV
  • A recent photograph
  • Scan copy of your passport information page
  • Scan copies of your degree and TEFL/TESOL certificates
  • Your current location and preferred start date

Option 1: Apply through the link.

Option 2: Apply through email (jobs@eslsuite.com) and write “Tianjin Public School – WP” in the Subject Line of the email.

Due to the volume of applications received, please understand it may not be possible for the company to contact each candidate individually. A recruitment professional will be in contact with you if we are interested in pursuing your candidacy further.

Thank you again for your interest in this position, and for choosing ESL Suite to assist you with your job search in China!

Sincerely,

Christopher Ribeiro

Managing Director at ESL Suite in Tianjin

Why Study TESOL?

Thinking about teaching ESL overseas?
Thinking about teaching ESL overseas?

A TESOL certificate is your passport into the thrilling field of Teaching English overseas. There are over 300 million people studying English in China alone, so your job prospects after completing the course are fantastic.

But, this question should really be: why do you want our TESOL Certificate Course over all others? We provide a comprehensive course, which includes practicum here in Tianjin, an online specialization, and lifetime career support. We prepare our students for all aspects of life overseas.

What is TESOL? Teaching English overseas is a word full of acronyms. Here’s an overview: TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language), TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language), and TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) all teach English to non-native English speakers. The difference is: TESL is for teaching in an English speaking country while TEFL is for teaching English abroad. TESOL encapsulates them both. CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) is the British equivalent to the TESOL, but the 80-hours a TESOL student completes at their own pace is done in a classroom setting.

Why would I want a TESOL Certificate instead of a TESL, TEFL, or CELTA certificate? A teaching certificate is an investment, so it’s important to think about the upfront costs, and the return on investment. CELTA is very well-known, but a TESOL can be completed in less time, and at a fraction of the cost. The last part is important, because unless the job you’re applying for specifically calls for a CELTA, you’ll probably be able to get the same job with a TESOL.

Which study options does ESL Suite offer? We have two different methods of study. The first is our In-class course which is offered in Tianjin, China. This is the preferred method of completion. Classes are fun, lively, and full of like-minded people. Students learn from each other, as well as the instructor. If you cannot find the time or cannot attend the course in China, you can take the course online. There is no difference in the materials covered, regardless of the method of study. So, it’s simply a matter of deciding which learning style is best for you, while taking into account your budget and schedule.

What kind of job can I get after I complete the course? When teaching abroad, you may teach students of all ages. Children as young as three go to English kindergartens, while senior citizens study English as a hobby. You might teach primary or secondary students, businessmen, housewives, other teachers, or people who study English to improve their job prospects. Most schools focus on one or two age groups, so if you have a very strong preference for a specific age, make sure you’re placed accordingly. English teachers are in high demand in China, South Korea, Taiwan, Turkey, and the Middle East, so it’s also a good idea to start thinking about which location fits your broader personal/professional goals.

How can I get started? We have weekly information seminars in Tianjin, but for those who don’t live nearby, we’re happy to answer questions by phone,email, or schedule a consultation via Skype. The course dates are listed below, and you may register for one of our sessions here.

2015 Courses

  • October 14-18
  • November 4-8
  • December 2-6
2016 Courses

  • January 20-24
  • February 24-28
  • March – Dec: TBD

“Friends of the Firm” Referrals: Don’t forget to tell a friend! We believe there’s no better source for teachers than from a trusted friend! That’s where you come in. We offer generous bonuses for referrals to our TESOL courses, or for successful teacher referrals. Here’s how it works:

  • Online TESOL referral: $50
  • In-Class TESOL referral: $100
  • Teacher referral: $100

***Bonuses are paid for TESOL referrals after the student has paid in-full; for teacher referrals 3-months after the teacher arrives in China. 

There’s no better motivation to launch your overseas teaching career than to enroll in a TESOL course. I did it seven years ago, and it completely changed my life. I came to Tianjin in 2009 and haven’t looked back. In the meantime, I’ve traveled to Japan, Korea, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, India, Indonesia, and at least a dozen other countries! And, I’m not alone – for many people, teaching English and traveling the world becomes a preferred lifestyle choice.

The Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu said, “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago; the second best time is now.” Your dreams also may be waiting for you just around the corner – get started today!

http://www.eslsuite.com

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